Monthly Archive for: ‘January, 2017’

  • Final Horse Protection Act Regulations on Hold

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    AHCThe following is an announcement from the American Horse Council.

    Recently, President Trump ordered a government wide freeze on all new federal regulations pending review. This order has put an indefinite hold on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) final regulations governing enforcement of the Horse Protection Act (HPA).

    On January 13, 2017, USDA announced a final HPA rule.   However, the final rule was not published in the Federal Register before President Trump issued his order to all federal agencies to withdrawal all regulations that had not yet been published pending review. The final rule would have made several major changes to current HPA regulations with the goal of ending soring.

    It will now be up to the Trump administration to decide whether or not to finalize the HPA rule. There is no timeline for review of the rule and the new administration could decide to issue a final rule at any time or withdrawal the rule completely. The HPA enforcement program will continue to operate under the current HPA regulations.

    Click Here To Read the Article on AHC

  • LTR Presents: Because We Can

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    Who says dressage is just for horses? We know better! Watch some amazing mules and riders show what they can do, including Lucky Three Sundowner and Buckeye!

  • Tell Congress to Ban U.S. Horse Slaughter & Export Once & For All!

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    The following is an update from the American Wild Horse Preservation.

    America’s horses need your help. Over 100,000 horses each year are shipped across the border and are brutally slaughtered. The threat of slaughter for America’s wild horses is real. The SAFE Act would protect America’s horses by banning horse slaughter in the U.S. and prohibiting the transport of American horses to Canada and Mexico for slaughter. It was reintroduced with bipartisan support in the House of Representatives last week. Your support is needed for this important legislation. The lives of hundreds of thousands of horses — both domestic and wild — are at stake, so please take action today!

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    Take Action

  • URGENT HELP NEEDED NOW – ON OUR WAY TO SOUTH DAKOTA

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    The following is an update from Chilly Pepper-Miracle Mustang Rescue.

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    As I steal a few moments to send out a quick update, Matt and I are on our way back to South Dakota. The good news is that we are delivering 4 horses to their new homes before we go back. We placed 2 last week and are so happy as we cannot afford to “rescue & not rehome”. lol However, we need help badly with the ongoing expenses involved in this operation and for the special needs kids who are landing at Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang.

    We are spending about $300 per month for milk powder per baby, and we currently have six on “liquid gold”. So that is roughly $1800 just for milk, and then we are going through about 4 bags? of milk pellets at roughly $100 each bag. These kids were a bit behind so they are taking extra. Add to that the enormous amounts of hay they are consuming and their bedding and their Mare and Foal Pellets, we are easily spending thousands on just the 6 babies alone. The good news is that they are doing better and better every day.

    We spent $1100+ on the last kids that came home to get them vetted and their lil hoofers done. This does not include Coggins or Health Certs etc. or to even get them home. As we are taking on several blind horses that have no where else to go, (including Frosty – the blind black stallion), we need to add additional shelter and make the pen for Shadow and the new blind kids larger than originally planned.

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  • There Are 100 Million Working Horses, Donkeys & Mules in the World– We Want to Help Them All

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    The following is an article from The London Economic.

    There are 100 million working horses, donkeys and mules in the world. They are the tractors, taxis and engines that power developing economies, working in the construction industry, carrying food and water, and transporting goods to market. It’s estimated that each animal can support a family of six, so around 600 million people’s lives are supported by a working equine – 8% of the world’s population. Without healthy working horses, donkeys and mules, they wouldn’t be able to put food on their tables, send their children to school or build better futures for themselves and their families. However, it’s estimated that more than half of these animals suffer from exhaustion, dehydration and malnutrition as a result of excessive workloads and limited animal health services

    Brooke is an international charity that protects and improves the lives of working equines. The UK based charity works to deliver significant and lasting change, even in some of the world’s most challenging areas. Their teams concentrate on training and support for owners of owners and handlers, as well as local vets, farriers, harness makers and animal traders to improve standards of care. They operate in 11 different countries, and fund small projects in others. Brooke also conducts research, and works with policy makers to make overarching changes to the way governments tackle working equine welfare.

    One of the countries that Brooke works in is Kenya, a country with almost 2 million donkeys. Around 50% of people live below the poverty line, so these animals support many people’s lives in both urban and rural areas, transporting food and fuels. Brooke has been working through local partners in the country since 2011, and opened an office in Nairobi in 2013, with programmes stretching from Turkana County in the North to Kajiado in the South. The work focusses on bringing communities together to make donkey welfare a group priority, with a financial focus.

    ©Brooke/Freya Dowson.

     

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  • Speakers For First Quarter Webinar Announced

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    AHCThe following is an announcement from the American Horse Council.

    On February 13th at 3:00 pm ET, the American Horse Council will host its first quarterly webinar for 2017. The topic will be “Climate Change and Equines.”

    “While the cause of climate change is of course a debated subject, there is no debate that climate change effects animals, sometimes drastically,” said AHC President Julie Broadway. “We wanted to educate people on understanding how your horses may be effected by these climate changes, and how you can be better prepared to keep your horses safe and comfortable with these changes.”

    David Herring, Director of Communication & Education at the NOAA Climate Program Office will be the featured speaker. Mr. Herring will discuss how they see changes in the weather affecting not only horses themselves, but also the areas in which they live, show, and are ridden. “Severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, and record-breaking snow and rain have devastated farms around the country recently,” said Mr. Herring. “We want people to be aware of how these potential changes in the climate can drastically affect their animals and their well-being.”

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  • How You Can Help Stop Horses, Camels and Other Animals Suffering On Your Holidays

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    The following is an article from Wander Lust.

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    “You don’t have to be very bright to see if an animal looks like it’s on Death Row,” says Jeremy Hulme, Chief Executive of animal welfare charity SPANA. “If you’re looking at a horse or mule, and it’s head is down, it’s looking thin and its bones are sticking out, it’s obviously not right. If it’s limping, you know it’s got problems.”

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    Most savvy travelers are now clued up on how animal experiences, from elephant rides to tiger temples, might be harmful to animals. Less attention is paid, though, to horses, donkeys, mules and camels put to work in the tourism industry, which is why SPANA has launched a Holiday Hooves campaign.

    Thousands of animals are used in travel experiences, from camel rides and horse-drawn carriages to mules carrying gear on expeditions. The animals are often essential to their owners’ livelihoods, but in some cases are cruelly treated, neglected or kept in poor conditions.

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  • Neighbors Fighting to Save Wild Horses Need Help!

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    The following is an update from the American Wild Horse Preservation.

    For decades, community groups have enjoyed and worked to protect the cherished wild horses that live in and around the Pine Nut Mountains Herd Management Area (HMA) in northern Nevada. But now the beloved Pine Nut horses are threatened by a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plan to round up 500 of 579 of the mustangs living there! 

    unnamedThese neighbors and the horses they love need our help today! Please weigh in against a devastating massive roundup and ask BLM to work with the local community to implement a birth control program for humane, in-the-wild management of the Pine Nut wild horses.

     

    Take Action

  • AHC Update: USDA Announces Final Horse Protection Act Rule

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    AHCThe following is an announcement from the American Horse Council.

    Today, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) announced final regulations governing enforcement of the Horse Protection Act (HPA). The HPA was passed in 1970 to stop the cruel practice of “soring” horses that was occurring in some sectors of the Tennessee Walking Horse, Racking Horse and Spotted Saddle Horse industry.

    The final rule would make several major changes to current HPA regulations with the goal of ending soring. The AHC is currently reviewing the details of the final rule to determine its impact on the horse industry. However, USDA seems to have made several modifications and clarifications to the final rule in accord with the comments submitted by the AHC and others.  AHC comments can be found here.

    Importantly, the USDA has made changes to the final rule that address horse industry concerns had regarding the proposed rule release last summer.  These changes include explicitly limited new prohibitions on pads, wedges, and action devices to “Tennessee Walking Horses and Racking Horses,” and removal of all references to “related breeds that performs with an accentuated gait that raises concerns about soring.” Additionally, USDA has adopted several proposals to make the rule less burdensome for smaller “flat shod” walking horse shows.  USDA also has clarified that certain reporting and record keeping requirements apply only to “Tennessee Walking Horse, Racking Horse shows.”

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  • AHC Update: NAHMS Equine Health Study 2015 Released

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    AHCThe following is an announcement from the American Horse Council.

    The USDA’s National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) released the first report from its Equine 2015 study, the Baseline Reference of Equine Health and Management in the United States 2015. The study was postponed because of 2015’s highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak.

    Equine 2015 was conducted in 28 states, chosen for study participation based, in part, on the size or density of the states’ equine population. Data collected for the study represented 71.6 percent of equids and 70.9 percent of U.S. operations with five or more equids. This report shares data collected in regards to population estimates, equid health management and healthcare events, disease testing, farm biosecurity protocols, and transportation.

    The Equine 2015 Study was designed to provide participants, industry, and animal-health officials with information on the nation’s equine population that will serve as a basis for education, service, and research related to equine health and management, while providing the industry with information regarding trends in the industry for 1998, 2005 and 2015/2016.

    The Baseline Reference of Equine Health and Management in the United States for 2015 can be found at: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahms/equine/downloads/equine15/Eq2015_Rept1.pdf

    Click Here To Read the Article on AHC

  • AHC Update: Safeguard American Food Exports Act Re-Introduced

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    AHCThe following is an announcement from the American Horse Council.

    The Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act (H.R. 113) has been re-introduced by Representatives Vern Buchanan (R-FL) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR). The bill is identical to legislation introduced last Congress and similar to other earlier bills that would in effect prohibit the slaughter of horses in the U.S. and the export of horses for slaughter.

    This bill cites health concerns as the primary rationale to prohibit the sale or export of horses or horsemeat for human consumption, because they are frequently treated with drugs that pose a serious threat to human health if eaten.  The bill would make it illegal under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to knowingly sell or transport horses or parts of horses in interstate or foreign commerce for purposes of human consumption.

    The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and the House Committee on Agriculture.

    If you have any questions please contact the AHC.

    Click Here To Read the Article on AHC

  • 540 ISPMB HORSES STILL NEED US!

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    The following is an update from Chilly Pepper-Miracle Mustang Rescue.

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    Happy New Year!

    I am sorry it has taken so long for an update. We had no internet for 11 days, and Matt and I have been working 12 hour+ days to “prep for winter”. As we were never supposed to be in South Dakota even up until Thanksgiving, staying until two days before Christmas really put us extremely far behind.

    The babies are improving greatly and enjoying the nursery! We do want to send out a special “Thank You” to Dee Gregory, who was (hopefully still is LOL) our “go to” guy who made it possible for Matt and I to safely leave our rescue. Without him, we would never have been able to “git ‘er done.”

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  • All About Equine – A Year in Review – 2016

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    This is an update from All About Equine Rescue.

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    2016 has been an Incredible Year for All About Equine Animal Rescue, Inc. (AAE) and we have YOU to thank for it! Let’s take some time to reflect on this past  year and to Thank you!

    In 2016 AAE, was able to take in 29 horses with your support.  We also placed 29 horses with their forever homes!  That means in 2016 our intake to adoption ratio was 100%!  That’s incredible!

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  • AWHP Update: Zeus

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    The following is an update from the American Wild Horse Preservation.

    Dear Meredith,

    This proud stallion we call Zeus was photographed living wild and free five years ago in the Wyoming’s Great Divide Basin Herd Management Area. He was leading his family to water… standing guard over his mares and youngsters as they drank.

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    Is Zeus still free? We don’t know. But he has a right to be. One of our toughest fights yet has been for the rights of wild horses to live wild and free in this area of land known as the Wyoming Checkerboard. This year, we delivered two important legal blows to the BLM’s plans to wipe out wild horses from this area to appease powerful ranching interests.

    But the fight goes on. In 2017, the BLM will attempt to change land use plans to “zero out” (eliminate all wild horses from) the Wyoming Checkerboard.

    Is Zeus still free? We don’t know. But he has a right to be.

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  • Little Big Shots!

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    Miniature mules Franklin and Francis and miniature horse Mirage show that good things come in small packages. Miniature equines need special handling, especially when they know they are “Little Big Shots” Enjoy the latest video with three of our miniatures of the Lucky Three Ranch!

  • UHC Roundup – January 2017

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    The following is an announcement from the UHC Roundup.

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    The Media Roundup is now the UHC Roundup, a publication with a new name and a broader scope.  In addition to news articles and events, the UHC Roundup highlights member programs and success stories spanning all breeds, disciplines, and regions, plus it has a new photo feature and a link to the UHC Blog.

    If you wish to share your story of unwanted horses becoming wanted again, contact the UHC at uhc@horsecouncil.org.

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  • Study Team Pinpoints Mutation Responsible For Albino Donkeys on Italian Island

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    The albino donkeys on Asinara Island. The animals will often seek shade among the derelict buildings during sunny days. Photo: Dirk Hartung CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

    The gene mutation responsible for albinism in donkeys on the Italian island of Asinara has been identified by researchers.

    A unique albino donkey sub-population lives on Asinara, which was closed to the public in 1885 to become an Italian quarantine site and later a prison colony. The 52 square kilometre island, northwest of Sardinia, is now a national park.

    The 100 to 120 albino animals live with coloured − usually grey − donkeys on the island. They interbreed, with no estimate available on the size of the hybrid population.

    Luca Fontanesi and his University of Bologna colleagues, in a short communication in the journal Animal Genetics, said the origin of the island’s white donkeys was uncertain and based only on legends. It was possible, they said, that they dated back to before the closure of the island to the public in the late 1800s.

    There has been no direct human intervention in the management of the donkeys for more than a century.

    The researchers delved into the genetic basis of the donkeys’ albinism, with the animals displaying a completely white coat colour, a lack of pigmentation in the skin, hair, eyelashes and eyebrows, and eyes that are light blue.

    These donkeys have poor sight and during sunny days will shelter inside the unused buildings of the prisoner colony.

    The study team suspected a mutation in the TYR gene was responsible for the albinism and they were proven correct after analysing data from genetic sequencing of seven Asinara albino donkeys and six coloured donkeys.

    They found what is known as a missense mutation, in which a change codes for a different amino acid. In this case it affected copper binding, ultimately resulting in a lack of pigmentation.

    The findings were confirmed in genetic testing of further donkeys. In all, 82 were tested.

    The study team said the isolation of the population and high inbreeding might be behind the increased frequency of the TYR mutation.

    They said the identification of the cause of albinism in the donkeys added a new natural animal model for this particular form of the condition in humans.

    Utzeri, V. J., Bertolini, F., Ribani, A., Schiavo, G., Dall’Olio, S. and Fontanesi, L. (2016), The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein. Anim Genet, 47: 120–124. doi:10.1111/age.12386

    The short communication can be read here.

  • Thank You From The Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue!

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    The following is a thank you from the Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue.

    Those of you who know me know that I am rarely at a lack for words. I’ve got a big yap. The overwhelming response to my request to raise $20,000. for the rescue however, has left me pretty much speechless. I am overwhelmed with gratitude and a profound sense of well-being for the animals in my care. I send a heartfelt thank you to each and every one of you who helped to make this happen.

    This has been a good year at Save Your Ass. Mostly happy endings, with a few not so happy, but that is to be expected. I have averaged 35 adoptions every year the rescue has been in operation. One year it was 32, last year it was 37, and this year I am at 39 adoptions with two adoptions in the works!!

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  • AHC Update: Three-Year Depreciation of Race Horses Not Extended to 2017

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    AHCThe following is an announcement from the American Horse Council.

    The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has published a proposed rule regarding withholding requirements on pari-mutuel winnings. The proposed rule would make changes to withholding requirements that are more accurate and reflect the current state of wagering in the horse racing industry.  These changes, if made final, will be of great benefit to horse players and the racing industry.

    Specifically, the proposed rule would define “amount of the wager” as the total amount wagered by a bettor into a specific pari-mutuel pool on a single ticket for purposes of determining whether wagering proceeds are subject to 25% withholding on winnings of $5,000 or more and are at least 300 times as large as the amount wagered.

    Currently, the IRS does not recognize the total amount wagered on an exotic bet with “boxes,” “wheels,” and “keys,” when determining whether the 300:1 ratio has been met and 25% withholding is triggered, only the  cost of the individual winning bet.  This greatly increases the number of winning bets that are subject to withholding and does not accurately reflect the actual amount bet and the actual amount won.

    The American Horse Council and the National Thoroughbred Racing Association have requested the IRS make the proposed change for many years.

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  • AWHP Update: Will You Fight For Them?

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    The following is an update from the American Wild Horse Preservation.

    Dear Meredith,

    Wild horses and burros are under attack every day. We are fighting for them every day, and we want to show you every day this week exactly what we are fighting for.

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    This valiant wild Wyoming stallion fought off five younger stallions to defend his beautiful snow-white mare, so heavily in foal she could barely move. Moments after the battle, he returned to his mare’s side and allowed her to rest her head on his back in the warm sun. 

    Chivalry is not dead, but these wild horses and their way of life could be if we are not successful in stopping the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) from wiping out wild horses in the Wyoming Checkerboard to appease powerful ranching interests.

    This year, we stopped a huge BLM helicopter roundup in this area. We scored two important legal victories that put the brakes… at least for now… on the BLM’s plan to eradicate wild horses from the Checkerboard. But the fight for the future of Wyoming’s wild herds goes on.

    We call this beautiful stallion Galahad and his mare, Snow White. They are a reason to give. Their future depends on you. 

    In Freedom,

    Suzanne Roy, Executive Director

    P.S. Today, you can double your impact for wild horses like Galahad and Snow White! Your year-end donation will be matched…so please give as generously as you can. Thank you! 

    Photo: Kimerlee Curyl

    Donate Now

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