Check Out the New Arrivals

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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Our horses & everyone at AAE 

Thanks you for caring!!

  We finished 2017 recapping many of our horse stories from the year, and along came 2018.  We’ve been quiet but we haven’t been idle.  AAE has been busy, and sadly, we have several new horses that joined us in January.  We have the beginnings of many new stories to tell, and we are hopeful we can share in just as many happy endings to come.
Many thanks to you for your continued support.
Without it, we couldn’t help horses like the ones below.

New Arrivals at AAE

To say January was a busy month at AAE is an understatement.  We took in seven horses; four were not anticipated, and we had to rearrange some paddocks to accommodate everyone.  Our volunteers worked diligently through winter weather in an expanded quarantine area.  It was a long few weeks, but everyone stepped up for the horses.  A huge thank you to everyone for their dedication to our horsey friends.  We are all very thankful to have a break in the weather, and we are looking forward to daylight savings in about a month!!
We have a long update, but we hope you will take time to read about each horse and get to know them.  They all need a sponsor.  If you’d like to contribute toward the monthly costs for a specific horse to support our work as we rehabilitate these horses and search for forever homes, please consider sponsoring one of these special souls.  Visit our website for more info.
If you would like to be a monthly sponsor,
please click the “Sponsor” link below the horse.
No doubt, these horses have already put a dent in our vet budget.  After reading each horse’s story, if you’d like to make a donation to help with the costs we’re incurring (and will incur) as these horses make their journey back to health, please click the link below to donate.

Meet Sandi

   Sandi came to AAE on Janaury 7, 2018, after her owner was experiencing a family health and financial crisis.  Sandi is a 5 year old Arabian mare.  We picked her up from her boarding facility in the midst of winter weather.
The facility owner said she had been moved to the roundpen because she ran right through electric fencing, “very hot” electric fencing.  Sadly, we found a very cute, but skinny lil’ mare enduring the elements with no shelter, no wind break, and no food.  We can’t help but wonder if she was in the roundpen because her owner was months behind in rent, or maybe she braved the “hot” fence because she was cold and needed food.
Sandi loaded quietly, but she didn’t travel well.  She danced in the trailer the entire ride to AAE.
Once at AAE, she had a difficult time settling into a paddock alone.
With a little time and some rearranging, she calmed and focused on food.
She’s making steady progress and is looking great.  This was only a week after arrival.

Thankfully, her vet check went well fairly well.  Besides her lack of weight, she has a few melanomas under/around her tail, not uncommon for white (gray) horses.  Fortunately, none are creating any issues that require removal.  Sandi needs dental work, which is scheduled in a few weeks to give her time to get strong and healthy.  She was a bit naughty for the farrier; she needs some extra work with handling her hind hooves, and she needs a bit of confidence.  She tends to rely on another horse for confidence and gets very stressed and reactive when no other horse is around.  We’ll work on building her confidence before we ask much more of her.
We were told Sandi has been ridden in the past, and she was described as “green, very green”.
Once her dental is done, wolf teeth removed, and her body condition improves, she’ll be evaluated more before she becomes available for adoption.
In the meantime, Sandi needs a sponsor.
If you would like to be her sponsor, please click the link below to set up a recurring monthly donation.
 (recurring monthly donation)

Meet Dia

  Dia came to AAE with her buddy Noche on Janaury 14, 2018.  Her owner lived alone and was experiencing a major health issue.  She was unable manage the physical requirements of caring for her two horses.  These two girls were delivered to AAE, and they unloaded from the trailer like it was just another day.  Ho hum!
Dia is a super cute little (~14.0hh), 21 year old Arabian mare.  She has a history of showing successfuly in halter, and her easy going temperament occasionally allowed someone to hop on and head down the trail, even though she had no formal training.  Her prior owner indicated she had not been ridden a lot, but she took it all in stride and did quite well.
Dia’s vet check went pretty well.  She has multiple melanomas under/around/on her tail and a few in other areas.  Two around in her rectal area need to be removed.  One is ulcerated and could be painful, and flies will be a nuisance.  The other is internal, on or near her anal sphincter, and it is golf ball sized.  It is pushing her rectum to the side.  If not removed, it will likely continue to grow and push more into the rectum and block the passage of manure.  She also has one in the corner of her mouth on the left side.  This one should be removed so she can comfortably wear a bit, should she be ridden with a bit in the future.  Dia needs dental work, and she’s scheduled in a few weeks.  So far, Dia has been easy to handle; she is good with the farrier; and she enjoys grooming and attention.  She’s a bit bossy around food, but otherwise, a really nice little gal.  Once her dental is done and her melanomas are removed, she will be further evaluated before she is available for adoption.

Dia’s melanoma removal surgery costs are estimated to $550-800.

If you would like help with the cost of Dia’s surgery,
please click the link below to make a donation.
If you would like to be a sponsor for Dia,
please click the link below to set up a recurring monthly donation.
 (recurring monthly donation)

Meet Noche

  Noche came to AAE with her buddy Dia on Janaury 14, 2018.
Noche is a super cute little (13.2hh), 20 year old Quarter Horse/Paso Fino mare.  She has a riding history, and an easy going temperament.
Noche appears to be in good health.  She is in good condition, but she’s also scheduled for dental work in a few weeks.  So far, Noche has been very easy to handle, good with the farrier, and she enjoys grooming and attention.  Once her dental is done, she’ll be further evaluated before she becomes available for adoption.
If you would like to be a sponsor for this lil gal, Noche,
please click the link below to set up a recurring monthly donation.
 (recurring monthly donation)

Meet Amigo

  Amigo came to AAE with two of his buddies, Rudy and Gunner, on January 17, 2018.  They were reliquished by a private party.  A picture speaks a thousand words.  I need not say more.
Amigo is a big, ol’ teddy bear with a huge heart.  You can tell he is so thankful to have food and TLC because he smiles at you with his eyes when he hangs his head out of his stall “window”.  He’s about 29 years old stands about 15.2 hands, and he weighed only about 840 pounds.  His body condition is worse than it looks; he has a thick (dead) winter coat that really hides his bony frame, almost as good as a blanket.  So far we’ve pulled off a good 250 to 300 ticks that are embedded under his “body rug” hair.
About a week after arriving, he suffered a bout of colic.  It was mild, but scary nonetheless knowing how weak and deprived his body is.  He was on a slow refeeding program consistent with UCD’s protocol for refeeding starving horses, but still had a little struggle.  Thankfully, thanks to some compassionate veterinary care from our docs at LBEMC, he rebounded quickly.
While he was down, you could see the sad condition he’s in.  Fortunately, as sensitive as horses are, it was a reminder of how resilient they can be.  This guy is a fighter!   We did a happy dance when we heard his bloodwork looked good, all things considered.  Surprisingly, he was also negative for Cushing’s.
Amigo is making slow, steady progress, and you can already see some improvement.  We’re hopeful he continues on to a smooth path to recovery.  This past weekend, several of our volunteers showered him with love…a good bath and more tick picking.  Though we have tried to removed them all, more are discovered with each grooming session.  Thank goodness for the warm, sunny weather!
A wet coat is a flat coat, and you can really see the gravity of his condition, even nearly three weeks into his refeeding program.
So far, Amigo has been very easy to handle, he is very patient with handling his hooves, he thoroughly enjoys grooming and attention, and he water/bathing were not an issue.  He has a visit with the farrier this week, and if his body condition improves enough over the next several weeks, he’ll also have dental work done in about a month.  Once his weight normalizes, he’ll be evaluated more before he becomes available for adoption.  Love, love, love this ol’ guy.
We were told he has been ridden, but bucks if the the ride is too long.  Beyond that, little is known about his past.  We’re simply looking forward a quick recovery so this guy can move on to a bright future in a forever loving home.
In the meantime, Amigo needs a sponsor.
If you would like to be a sponsor for this ol’ guy, Amigo,
please click the link below to set up a recurring monthly donation.
 (recurring monthly donation)
Thank you to Ms. B for being a voice for these guys and bravely facilitating their relinquishment by their owner.  More thanks to John and Buckaroo Leather for providing some leads and halters to help on rescue day.

Meet Rudy

  Rudy came to AAE with Amigo and Gunner on January 17, 2018.  Like Amigo, pictures speak a thousand words.
Rudy is a big, love, too.  He’s about 23 years old, stands about 16.1 hands, and weighed only about 875 pounds.  His photos are more representative of his body condition than Amigo’s, as his coat is not nearly as thick, heavy, dead.  So far we’ve pulled a lot of ticks off Rudy, too, but not close to the number from Amigo.
Rudy is doing well on his refeeding program, similarly, consistent with UCD’s protocol for refeeding starving horses.  It was a surprise though, as his teeth are in dire need of dental work.  His front teeth are in much worse condition than those visible in the back.
His hooves are also in need of a trim, and he’s scheduled this week.  Hoof neglect takes many forms.  Rudy has some gnarly heel cracks with deep thrush in all four hooves.
So we found some soaking “boots” (a little big for him, but they worked) and soaked all four feet.
Sadly, beneath all of the crust and crud are some pretty angry sores.  They’ll take some time and effort to heal his heels, but they should be on the right track path now.
So far, Rudy has also been very easy to handle, he is very patient with handling his hooves, and he enjoys grooming and attention.  He has a visit with the farrier this week, and if his body condition improves enough over the next several weeks, he’ll also have dental work done in about a month.  Once his weight normalizes, he’ll be evaluated more before he becomes available for adoption.
We were told he was been ridden quite a bit and had been used for barrel racing.  Beyond that, little is known about his past.  We’re looking forward a quick recovery for Rudy, too, so we can find a forever loving home for him, too.
In the meantime, Rudy needs a sponsor.
If you would like to be a sponsor for Rudy,
please click the link below to set up a recurring monthly donation.
 (recurring monthly donation)
Thank you to Ms. B for being a voice for these guys and bravely facilitating their relinquishment by their owner.  More thanks to John and Buckaroo Leather for providing some leads and halters to help on rescue day.

Meet Gunner

Gunner is the third muskateer.  He came to AAE with Amigo and Rudy on January 17, 2018.
Thankfully, Gunner is in much better condition than his pals.
Gunner is about 19 years old, stands about 15.0 hands.  He has some trust issues and we’re slowly earning his trust.  So far, we haven’ identified any major issues.  We’ve found some ticks on Gunner, too, but he’s not infested like his buddies.  He likely needs dental care, and his hoofs are in need of a trim.
Gunner is a handsome guy, and we’re looking forward to breaking through the surface of this guy and earning his trust.
So far, Gunner tends to be evasive for haltering, is fairly good leading, but needs more confidence; he seems to feel vulnerable with leg and hoof handling; and he is quite connected to Amigo.  That being said, he’s made regular progress, and he’s becoming more willing to interact with humans.  He’ll also have dental work done in about a month, and hopefully, we can help him be more confident with leg and hoof handling soon, so he can have a good experience with the farrier.  Once we earn his trust, he’ll be evaluated more before he becomes available for adoption.
We were told he was “broke” but regressed after not being ridden for some time.  Beyond that, little is known about his past.  We’re looking forward earning Gunner’s trust so we can find a forever loving home for him, too.
In the meantime, Gunner needs a sponsor.
If you would like to be a sponsor for Gunner,
please click the link below to set up a recurring monthly donation.
 (recurring monthly donation)
Thank you to Ms. B for being a voice for these guys and bravely facilitating their relinquishment by their owner.  More thanks to John and Buckaroo Leather for providing some leads and halters to help on rescue day.

Remember Red?

  Red came back to AAE in January after his adopter faced a financial crisis.  He was working two jobs to make ends meet and found he had no time for Red.  He knew it wasn’t good for Red considering his needs.
If you remember Red, you’ll remember he had severe trust issues and found it hard simply being in the presence of unfamiliar humans.   He was high maintenance in terms of needing continuous interaction to sustain a trusting relationship.  Red has come a long way, but now has to learn to trust new people again.  Before rehoming again, we’ll take time to expose Red to new people on a regular basis until he can readily accept anyone.
In the meantime, Red needs a sponsor.
If you would like to be a sponsor for Red,
please click the link below to set up a recurring monthly donation.
 (recurring monthly donation)

Kaya, Our Rock Horse! 

No pun intended.  She has a stone, but not that kind of stone.  Kaya is a long time resident of AAE, and she is one of our most trusted, dependable, reliable, and beloved horses.  She is calm, quiet, confident, and willing to do just about anything, seemlessly.  She helps new volunteers learn about horses, and she’s filled a lot of children’s dreams, not to mention the love she bestows on our volunteers on a daily basis.
A few weeks ago, she suffered a rough bout of colic that had the vet out two days in a row, then she ended up at Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center for a few days.  Thankfully, she’s home now and doing fine.  It turns out, we’re not certain what caused her discomfort, but we discovered she has a golf ball-sized stone in her small colon (like a kidney stone, not really a rock).  The size of the stone is in one of those gray areas:  it’s small enough that it might pass, but it’s big enough that it might not pass.  She also had a little bit of sand in her gut.  Neither was severe enough to be an obvious cause of her pain, and it could have even been something completely different. Fortunately, it resolved, and she was able to come home.
The stone still hasn’t passed, and it may not….or maybe it will?  We’re hopeful, it will rest quietly where it is for the rest of her life!  Needless to say, her veterinary costs for two visits to AAE, a couple nights at the clinic, and all of the diagnostics were extensive.
If you’re able to contribute to Kaya’s veterinary costs to help “replenish” our veterinary fund, it will help support future veterinary care for other horses throughout the year.

DONATE 

As you can see, it’s been a very busy January, and we’ve already put that dent in our veterinary budget for the year.  Please help us continue our efforts on behalf of horses in need.
Help replenish our veterinary fund by donating now.

Fosters Needed for 

Senior/Companion Horses 

  We’ve had a huge influx of calls from people needing help with senior horses, but we don’t have enough space/resources for more senior horses without foster homes.  We have a waiting list.  Can you help?  Do you have a lonely horse?….an empty stall or pasture?..or simply a love for senior horses?
If you don’t want to adopt, we offer a long term foster program for some senior/companion  horses to help support additional space needs for senior horses.  There are potential tax benefits.
For more information, please contact wendy@allaboutequine.org.

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