Equine Rescues

 

 

 

 

 

List of Equine Rescues


Saved the Best for Last

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue: Let's Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018 1 Day Left, AAE Residents! The heart of our volunteer activities begin with our residents.  it all begins with our minis, ponies, and our full-sized horses.  Our new volunteers learn about basic care and handling with our most reliable, trustworthy, and dependable horses.  They have their stories, too, but we don't often talk about them because their story came and went.  Let's revisit.... RUSTY Rusty is our 31, soon to be 32-year old Arabian gelding that came to us in 2010 due to a financial distress and an impending deployment situation. Rusty was loved beyond words, but his mom knew she couldn't give him what he needed, and she worried that when she was deployed, there wouldn't be anyone experienced enough to provide the care he needed for as long as it might be.  So she made the difficult decision to find a safe home for him. Shortly after he arrived, we discovered some really nasty summer sores on his "private parts".  Sadly, they were well hidden, and they were discovered during his vet exam.  It took several vet visits for cleaning with sedation before he healed.  A while later, we found a sarcoid in his ear that started getting irritated and growing.  Ear sarcoids are challenging to treat because the meds can spread into the ear canal and damage the inner ear.  Once again, Rusty had several rounds of treatment with Dr. Stolba until his ear finally healed.  Fortunately, it has been several years, and the sarcoid has not returned. Rusty has been an AAE steady since he got here.  Early on, he gave lessons.  Then he became our go to guy for birthday parties and kids programs.  He has given many ...
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SYALER eNewsletter

The following is from Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue: Dear SYALER friends, It's another cold one today but I am feeling very grateful... I'm not living on Mt. Washington, in Northern NH where the temperature was MINUS 78 degrees this morning!!! I'm also very grateful for all our wonderful supporters who have already helped us get closer to our end of the year fund raising goal of $35,000. I'm writing to encourage any of you reading this who have not yet made a donation to please do what you can to help. Reach underneath those couch cushions and send what you find! Every bit really does make a difference. Our supporters are the best. I have become friends with so many who have adopted from us, who donate to us and even those who just call for advice in dealing with issues they may be having with their donkey or mule. Making these friends is a huge bonus of the job. We currently have one, fantastic, full time paid employee. But we have reached the point in our growth that in order to sustain the level of care the animals require and deserve, another part time employee is needed. With the new tax laws taking effect donation write offs will be subject to change. So NOW is the time! Every penny we receive goes toward the care of the animals. Again, I am very, very grateful for the funds raised thus far. Please, on this last day of the year, do whatever you can do to help us continue our mission. I wish everyone all good things in the coming year. May we see more peace, love, and kindness toward each other as well as our animal friends. Ann President & Shelter Manager Donate ...
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Mini but Mighty!

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue: Let's Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018 2 Days Left, Mighty Mini Ones! Every day throughout the year, our mini herd is here to put smiles on the faces of our volunteers and visitors.  Our little guys are some of the best ambassadors for AAE and horses alike.  Each has his or her own story of how they came to AAE. PATCHES Patches, the little princess, ha ha!  Patches is an older mini (20-something) that came to AAE from a dog rescue in Fall 2012.  She was on the thin side and a bit lonely.  We thought she'd be perfect for the kids around AAE.  Little did we know, kids weren't her forte.  She tolerated them at best.  Patches idea of a job is eating.  Eating hay, eating grass, eating pellets, eating anything.  Really, eating everything.  If Patches isn't eating, she isn't happy, haha.  Patches is cutest when she trots down to the barn for her morning treat.  She bounces, she smiles, excitement exudes from the tips of her hair.  The trail back to the "farm", on the other hand, is a slow, dreary trip.  Ho hum!  Really, Patches is adorable.  She's a little sass, and a little sweet.  She's the perfect Thelwell pony that needs a story written after her. MARSHMALLOW You met Marshmallow earlier this month, but now you can hear the rest of the story.  Marshy-man came to AAE in March 2014.  He was quite sickly.  He had been at another rescue, and they were unable to solve his problems.  He had been rescued once by this rescue, gone to a therapy home, and returned to be rescued again.  The back story isn't entirely clear, but what we know is that Marshy was a sick guy ...
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SYALER eNewsletter

The following is from Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue: Good Deep Freeze Afternoon SYALER Friends, Mother Nature has offered us the splendor of a snow-covered landscape and the glinting beauty of ice-coated trees this final week of 2017. But she is also challenging us with these continued days of sub-zero temperatures. Doing anything outdoors right now is difficult if not dangerous. Seeing to the daily needs of numerous rescue donkeys and mules in this extreme cold is downright dreadful. There is good reason to worry more about the herd as this bitter cold can cause colic among other things. Ann must venture out regularly to make sure the heated water troughs are always topped off. She maintains separate heated water sources containing electrolytes and in these brutal, arctic days keeps hay in front of every animal 24 hours a day. Just the three draft mules alone are going through half a dozen bales of hay a day at $5.50 each! Ann and Hannah have also been making hot mashes for the long ears consisting of herbal-tea-soaked hay stretcher pellets and a handful of black oil sunflower seeds. All of this plus the usual chores requires Ann and her help to be outside more often for long stints and it is NOT easy. On top of the cold and extra weather-related tasks, yesterday the farm tractor seized up and is currently awaiting pick up by the "tractor ambulance." Who knows what THAT will cost??! Then one of the big water heaters died with a nearly full tank of water, the barn camera kicked the bucket and the "bad ass" mules ripped the big, heavy door off of the tack room! In warmer weather these things would be annoying, maybe even somewhat humorous. When you're working outdoors on a windy 12 ...
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